Category Archives: Wood

Electrical Completed, Lime Technology Pays a Visit

Click here to view the entire Nauhaus Prototype Construction Chronology.

We were excited to have Ian Pritchett and Mario Machnicki from Lime Technology, makers of Hemcrete, come by to check out our building for the first time.  We had some great discussions about Hemcrete, earthen blocks, construction details and more.  The electrical work has been completed, and the walls are ready for the hemp installation.

Jeff Buscher, Tim Callahan, Ian Pritchett, Mario Machnicki
Jeff Buscher, Tim Callahan, Ian Pritchett, Mario Machnicki
Ian Pritchett and Jeff Buscher talk about earthen blocks.
Ian Pritchett and Jeff Buscher talk about earthen blocks.
Southeast View
Southeast view of the nearly-completed framing of the Nauhaus Prototype
Electrical Box Installation
Electrical Box Installation
The electrical boxes are mounted on blocking so that they will be flush to the inside of the 12" walls.
The electrical boxes are mounted on blocking so that they will be flush to the inside of the 12" walls.

Asheville GO Helps Out

Today, the folks from Asheville Green Opportunities came to help out.  In the meantime, Matt and his crew started putting up rafters.

Click here to view the entire Nauhaus Prototype Construction Chronology.

Asheville GO
Asheville GO
asheville go 2
Asheville GO Volunteers
Installing Blocking for Electrical
Installing Blocking for Electrical
Tony Beurskens Directs Asheville GO Volunteers
Tony Beurskens Directs Asheville GO Volunteers
Elijah and Chris
Elijah and Chris

Finished Scaffolding
Finished Scaffolding
Matt Installing Rafter
Matt Installing Rafter
East Gable
East Gable

Framing and Drainage

Today the framing of the second floor began, and measures were taken to provide proper drainage from the building.

Click here to view the entire Nauhaus Prototype Construction Chronology.

Tim uses a custom-made tool to measure for the Hemcrete.
Tim uses a custom tool to measure for Hemcrete.

David Madera stopped by to discuss Hemcrete.
David Madera stopped by to discuss Hemcrete.
A strip drain is placed at the bottom of each wall.
A strip drain is placed at the bottom of each wall.
Gravel is shoveled into the Eastern trench.
Gravel is shoveled into the Eastern trench.
East Wall
Wast Wall Framing

Framing Continues

This week, Matt and his crew continued to frame.  The bottom plate was bolted to the slab, and the TJI joists were installed.

Click here to view the entire Nauhaus Prototype Construction Chronology.

Detail of Bottom Plate at Termite Barrier
Detail of Bottom Plate at Termite Barrier
The bottom plate is bolted to the AAC through the Advantek.
The bottom plate is bolted to the AAC through the Advantek.
North wall framing with termite barrier visible.
North wall framing with termite barrier visible.
The 2nd floor structure starts with 16" TJIs.
The second floor structure starts with 16" TJIs.
East and North Framing with Rim Band on Top
East and North Framing with Rim Band on Top


Framing Begins

Today, Matt and his crew started framing the lower level walls.  The 2×4 wood studs are placed 2′ on center rather than 16″ because the 12″ of Hemcrete will provide enough stiffness to the structure.

Click here to view the entire Nauhaus Prototype Construction Chronology.

Matt frames the Southeast window
Matt frames the Southeast window.
Matt works on the top plate.
Matt works on the top plate.

Framing the South Wall
Framing the South Wall
The lower level is nearly completed at the end of the day.
The lower level is nearly completed at the end of the day. To the right the well is visible.

Pure Wood

Instead of treating wood with arsenic, Bay Tree Technologies heat treats it. Bay Tree is located in Memphis, but their first kiln is in Terra Haute, Indiana. Right now they’re only making 1.25″x5″ decking. They say the process reduces expansion/contraction by 80%.

From EBN:

In a multistep process lasting 50–60 hours, Bay Tree first heats lumber to about 210°F (100°C) for preconditioning and drying. A second stage of heating boosts the temperature to between 370°F and 480°F (190°C–250°C), which chemically transforms sugars in the wood into forms that cannot be digested by insects or eaten by decay organisms. Then steam conditioning restores some moisture to the wood. By comparison, conventional lumber kilns operate at about 165°F (74°C)…

All PureWood boards are suitable for outdoor above ground and ground- contact applications and carry a 25-year warranty—even in ground-contact. The product can be painted, stained, and sanded just like conventional wood…

PureWood is fairly expensive, likely because of the high energy costs involved. Bay Tree Technologies is positioning PureWood as a high-end decking product, similar in price to the “tropical” composite products, such as Trex Brasilia and TimberTech Earthwood, or to clear redwood, according to Long. This price is significantly higher than that of conventional copper-treated decking. Long says that costs may come down somewhat with competition (as other thermally modified wood products enter the market), but he doesn’t think it will ever be cost-competitive with chemically infused wood.

Dealers in our area:

Mountain Lumber Company of Boone-Banner Elk, Inc.
9877 Hwy 105 South
Boone, NC 28607
828-963-7524

Wilson Lumber
Old Hwy 64
Murphy, NC 28906
828-837-7919

Local Wood Products

RUSTIC EDGE

http://www.rusticedgefurnishings.com

About

The start of  the design process

This is where our design process begins!

Our work has always taken a top down approach. From our more rustic days till now, we have always thought it important to know where your materials come from. The finished piece is more real when there is no disconnect between the cutting down of a tree and the application of the last coat of oil. Having control of every step of the process not only gives us unique design capabilities but it is almost virtually wasteless. Trees, which would normally see a quick ride through the mulcher, get whittled down in a way that allows them to recognize something more meaningful.